Routine Oral Exams

In addition to an excellent oral care regimen at home, you should visit your dentist at least every six months to undergo a dental oral exam, ensuring the continued health of your teeth.

If you skip even one routine oral exam, new oral issues can quickly advance. These issues would most likely require expensive treatments.

Routine oral exams ensure that problems are caught early and treated conservatively. Many oral health problems can even be reversed if spotted early enough. However, if left alone to advance, they can grow beyond your mouth and affect your general health.

Oral Exams, Routine Oral Exams, treat gum disease, oral cancer

The Mouth-Body Health Connection

The status of your mouth can signal problems in other areas of your body, so visiting your dentist twice a year can help maintain your overall health. A cavity, for example, can advance to the inner tooth and cause an infection. If not managed with root canal therapy, the bacteria can invade the bloodstream and cause a critical systemic infection.

Likewise, studies have shown a connection between gum disease and health ailments such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and dementia, so it pays to undergo regular checkups to detect and treat gum disease early when it is reversible so that you can decrease your risk of other health issues.

Medical History

During your dental oral exam, your dentist will evaluate your medical history. Knowing whether or not you’ve been diagnosed with specific medical conditions can help your dentist decide if you are susceptible to oral problems.

Additionally, your current medications can make you more vulnerable to forming cavities or periodontal disease. At your six-month checkup, be sure to inform your dentist if you have been diagnosed with any new health conditions. In addition, don’t be afraid to tell your dentist if you’ve had anxiety over past dental visits. They will present you with several options to make you comfortable during oral exams and treatments.

Dental X-Rays

If you haven’t had dental X-rays for some time, the dentist will need to take images of your teeth and jaw during your appointment. The frequency of X-rays depends on your oral history and your risk of developing tooth decay. Panoramic dental X-rays help detect cavities or bone loss in the jaw.

Visual Examination

A visual exam can help your dentist discover most oral health problems, including:

  • Cavities in teeth: Using a tool to gently probe the entire tooth surface, the dentist can detect any soft spots that may indicate decay. If caught early, which is most often the case with patients who maintain their routine oral exams, tooth decay is sometimes reversed with an expert fluoride treatment.
  • Gum Disease: Similar to cavities, periodontal disease is identified using a dental probe. The dentist will use the probe to measure the spaces between your teeth and gums to determine if periodontal disease has started. If early gum disease is detected, it can usually be reversed with professional teeth cleaning and an excellent at-home oral hygiene regimen.
  • Oral Cancer: Your dentist will visually inspect the lips, throat, and tongue areas to check for signs of oral cancer like unusual sores, lumps, or rough patches.
  • Bite and Jaw Issues: A misaligned bite can create a host of difficulties with your teeth and jaws, including pain in the jaw and grinding teeth. Stress also causes people to grind their teeth, leading to jaw problems such as TMJ disorder.

Teeth Cleaning

Deep cleaning is suggested every six months, so you may want to merge your checkup and cleaning dates for the sake of convenience. Your dental hygienist will start the teeth cleaning by eliminating tartar buildup with an instrument called a scaler.

After scaling, they will clean your teeth with a paste that includes mild abrasives to remove plaque and stains, leaving your teeth smooth and less likely to collect bacteria.

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FAQ for DENTAL BONDING Treatment

No, dental bonding isn’t painful. When Dr. Hamlett or Dr. La Mastra applies bonding to repair a tooth, they are only working on the surface of the tooth. Some people may experience tooth sensitivity after the procedure is finished, but this is often easily managed with over-the-counter pain relievers and typically goes away quickly.

No, dental bonding isn’t painful. When Dr. Hamlett or Dr. La Mastra applies bonding to repair a tooth, they are only working on the surface of the tooth. Some people may experience tooth sensitivity after the procedure is finished, but this is often easily managed with over-the-counter pain relievers and typically goes away quickly.

No, dental bonding isn’t painful. When Dr. Hamlett or Dr. La Mastra applies bonding to repair a tooth, they are only working on the surface of the tooth. Some people may experience tooth sensitivity after the procedure is finished, but this is often easily managed with over-the-counter pain relievers and typically goes away quickly.

No, dental bonding isn’t painful. When Dr. Hamlett or Dr. La Mastra applies bonding to repair a tooth, they are only working on the surface of the tooth. Some people may experience tooth sensitivity after the procedure is finished, but this is often easily managed with over-the-counter pain relievers and typically goes away quickly.

-Faqs

FAQ for Routine Oral Exams

On average, a typical dental exam and dental hygiene appointment takes around 45-60 minutes. But depending on your oral health condition, it may take more time to address your issues.

Having a dental exam is a little bit risky. You may be uncomfortable during cleaning, yet it is not painful. Dental X-rays are safe for most people. But they are not recommended for pregnant women.

The purpose of the oral exam is to collect information about your oral and overall health. In addition, a dentist can obtain all the baseline information at your first visit and update/chart all current information regarding your history. 

It is recommended that you not eat or drink anything (except for water) at least 5 hours before your scheduled appointment.